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Materials Science

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Materials Science Overview

Materials Science Job Search

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Materials Science Overview

According to the US Department of Labor, Materials Scientists are "involved in the development, processing, and testing of the materials used to create a range of products, from computer chips and aircraft wings to golf clubs and snow skis. They work with metals, ceramics, plastics, semiconductors, and composites to create new materials that meet certain mechanical, electrical, and chemical requirements. They also are involved in selecting materials for new applications." According to the Sloan Cornerstone Career Center, in "both small and large organizations...in industries as diverse as: semiconductor, consumer products, communications, medical devise and computers." For more details, visit the Occupational Outlook HandbookSloan Cornerstone Career Center and the Material Science department web site.

Top employers in the field include: Unilever, Bayer, Alcoa, Corning, L'Oreal. The Material Science and Engineering department and Sloan Cornerstone Career Center host more lists.

Materials Science Job Search

While some large organizations may recruit in the Fall semester, many others will seek full-time hires on an “as needed” basis. The key is to start your search early so that you do not miss opportunities. Use resources like the professional associations listed below to apply to positions and seek out networking opportunities, attend CCE’s Engineering Consortium Career Fair and Engineering Industry Showcase, and pay attention to your departments’ emails and your LionSHARE job agent. Many engineers continue on for a master's degree either immediately after graduation or after a few years of work experience. A master's degree generally takes two years of study. Working in entry-level positions usually means executing the research, plans, or theories which someone else has originated. With additional experience and education, materials engineers begin to tackle projects solo or, at least, accept responsibility for organizing and managing them for a supervisor. Those materials engineers with advanced degrees or a great deal of experience can move into supervisory or administrative positions within any one of the major categories, such as research, development, or design.

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      Last updated December 2014